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31 women to watch out for

Now in its second year, the PHMuseum Women Photographer Grant has a simple premise – to recognise and award world-class photographers, who also happen to be women. Judged this year by a prestigious panel including Magnum photographer Alessandra Sanguinetti and The Photographers’ Gallery senior curator Karen McQuaid, the Grant has two main sections – The Women Photographer Grant and the New Generation Prize for those under 30 years of age. This year the following series have made the shortlist: Aletheia Casey, No Blood Stained the Wattle Alexa Vachon, Rise Alice Mann, Drummies Anna Boyiazis, Finding Freedom in the Water Ayline Olukman, Psyche Claudia Gori, The Sentinels: Electrosensitivity in Italy Diana Markosian, Santa Barbara Elena Anosova, Out-of-the-Way Eleonora Strano, The Dark Embrace Encarni Pindado, Central American, Women Migration Giya Makondo-Wills, The Came From the Water While the World Watched Gulnara Samoilova, Lost Family Iggy Smalls, Neverland Johanna Maria Fritz, Like a Bird Karolina Gembara, Seven Sisters Ksenia Kuleshova, Abkhazia Laura Pannack, The Cracker Lee Grant, The Korea Project (Working Title) Louisa Boeszoermeny, The State I Am …

Shahidul Alam is granted bail

Award-winning photographer Shahidul Alam has spent over 100 days in jail, but - according to Reuters and several Bangladeshi newspapers - has finally been granted bail by the High Court this morning. "We're delighted that ultimately the court has granted him bail," said his lawyer Sarah Hossain in the Reuters' report, adding she expected her client to be out soon. The 63-year-old photographer and activist was arrested at his home in Dhaka on 05 August, and was charged the next day with violating Section 57 of Bangladesh’s Information and Communication Technology Act (ICT), after giving an interview to Al Jazeera on the current wave of student protests in Bangladesh against unsafe roads. In the interview, he stated that these actions stemmed from anger about widespread government corruption, and the charges mean he faces up to 14 years in prison.

Roll up, roll up for the Martin Parr Foundation membership scheme

Would you want Martin Parr to take your portrait? You might say its a brave soul who goes in front of his penetrating lens, but it’s part of a portfolio of benefits the Martin Parr Foundation is launching in its Membership Scheme. Parr set up the Bristol-based Foundation in 2014 to house his archive, but in October 2017 it opened to the public in a purpose-built space, offering free access to much more - a rolling programme of exhibitions, a large photobook library, and a growing collection of prints. Parr’s used the opportunity to hone in on British and Irish photographers, as well as work taken in the British Isles by others, and put the focus on their documentary work - an area which he believes is still underrated.

Looking for meaning in Rafa Raigón’s Ikigai

Originally from Andalucia, southern Spain, Rafa Raigón started out in the world of words – acting, and writing plays and poetry. Then he met his partner, a doctor from Berlin, and on moving to Germany, found himself without the necessary language skills to pick up again in theatre. The couple had a child and, staying at home to look after her, Raigón found himself taking photographs instead. “I discovered the creative power of photography,” he says. “The need to express myself led me to photography, finding a tool and a language that allowed me to tell my stories without needing to know German or having friends and people with whom to relate. Now my German is quite advanced and my circle of friends has grown but photography is here to stay and it has become a need in my day-to-day life.” Raigón now has three children, aged 3, 6, and 8, and he’s still the one in charge of looking after them and the house – and he’s also still taking photographs. Taking a one-year seminar …

Creative Brief: Andrea Kurland, Huck

When the first issue of Huck went to press in 2006, it was quite different to what it is today. Started by a team of friends passionate about the skate and surf scenes, and formed soon after the closure of Adrenalin magazine, where many of them had worked, it championed the personal stories of the sports’ icons and surrounding culture, rather than the action. Though still passionate about radical culture, Huck is now decidedly less niche. “Over the years, the voice we’ve always had as an alternative to the mainstream became more relevant to more people,” says Andrea Kurland, who has been part of the team from the start, and became editor-in-chief in 2010. “As we’ve grown, the generation that grew up with us has become more socially and politically engaged. This is now very embedded in the magazine, so we’ve been bolder and braver with this particular world stance.”